cienciatk   Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas
  Buscador de contenidos      Búsqueda Avanzada >>
  RSS

Bullet  ¿Qué es Cienciatk?

linea separacion

  FONDO DOCUMENTAL
Bullet  Documentos por categorías
Bullet  Documentos por colección
Bullet  Novedades


linea separacion

  ATENCIÓN AL USUARIO
Bullet  Preguntas frecuentes
Bullet  Aportación de fondos
Bullet  Contacto


linea separacion
Acceso a usuarios
    E V E N T O
        Genomic analysis of arthropod; endosymbiont relationships. Seminario MNCN
R E T R A N S M I S I Ó N
Video

Próximamente >>
Todas los vídeos están asociadas a sus respectivos derechos de autor.

Duración: 01:00 hs.

Seminarios de Investigación MNCN

 

Viernes 24 de abril, 12h
Salón de Actos del Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, Madrid
 
 
Título: Genomic analysis of arthropod; endosymbiont relationships.

 

Ponente: Christoph Bleidorn, Universität Leipzig, Alemania.

 

Resumen:

Several evolutionary phenomena in arthropods were shown to be due to the presence of inherited symbionts, e.g., sex-ratio-distortion, cytoplasmic incompatibility, conferring resistance to pathogens, nutritional mutualism and others. All these phenomena may be induced by Wolbachia, an alpha-proteobacterium that is estimated to occur in about 60% of all terrestrial arthropods.

Other endosymbionts are comparatively understudied and known only from a few model systems. Wolbachia is exclusively inherited maternally via the germ line, but horizontal transfer across host species boundaries seems to be a common theme.

 

Using a PCR-based Multi Locus Sequence Typing (MLST) we investigated possible routes for horizontal transfer in bees and provide a framework by which precise assumptions about shared evolutionary histories of Wolbachia and a host taxon can be modeled and tested. Wolbachia diversity is classified into different supergroups. In general, Wolbachia are either widespread, opportunistic reproductive parasites of arthropods (supergroups A and B) or essential mutualists in a single group of filarial nematodes, including many species of medical significance (supergroup C and D). Other distinct Wolbachia strain groups are known only from a small number of hosts: supergroup E is found in springtails, supergroup H in termites.

 

Using complete genomes we were able to present a first comprehensive phylogenomic analysis of Wolbachia supergroup relationships. Our results suggest that the ability of some arthropod-infecting Wolbachia to universally infect and to adapt to a broad range of hosts quickly is restricted to a single monophyletic lineage (containing supergroups A and B). Thus, the currently observable pandemic has likely a single evolutionary origin and is unique within the radiation of Wolbachia strains. 

 

 

 

Resolución mínima: 1024 x 768 Navegadores: Firefox 3.5.1/Internet Explorer 7.0
Todas las imágenes, vídeos y audios están protegidas por sus respectivos derechos de autor
Logos